Archive for the ‘Painting From Picture’ Category

Photo To Canvas - Photo To Portrait With Oil Painting Effect

http://www.canvasbuddy.co.uk – Photo to picture portrait and painting from picture. If you’re looking for a photo to canvas effect or a photo to oil painting…
Video Rating: 3 / 5

Oil Painting in dry brush technique. Ich male seit 2007 Portraits nach Fotovorlage auf Bestellung. so einfach geht das: 1. Dein Foto an portrait@email.de sch…

I was recently asked to create a tutorial for Advanced Photoshop magazine and i thought i’d be a good idea to create “speed painting” video of the whole process. This will be in issue 73, which is on sale from 12 August! Make sure you grab yourself a copy! The whole picture took a few hours to create, so video is seriously sped up. Music by my awesome hubby, www.youtube.com have a listen 🙂 Let me know what you think in comments and subsribe to me to see more cool stuff coming soon 🙂 See the final pic – elenasham.deviantart.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5

The Smiths in rare pictures.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Top Tips on Painting from a Photograph

Article by Catherine Calder

Top Tips on Painting from a Photograph – Art – Painting

Search by Author, Title or Content

Article ContentAuthor NameArticle Title

Home
Submit Articles
Author Guidelines
Publisher Guidelines
Content Feeds
RSS Feeds
FAQ
Contact Us

Photographs are very handy reference materials. When you decide to paint a picture you can use a photo and you do not need to worry about the weather or time of day. I do not like to paint when it is raining and obviously night time painting sessions can be a challenge.

However when you have photos to use you can paint whenever the mood takes you.

There are really two main ways to use photos.

1. Using just one photo and painting your version of the scene2. Using several photos and choosing sections from them to compose a different scene altogether

Using One Main Photograph

When you are using one main photo for the painting there are a few things you may want to consider.

You do not need to use all of the things from the photo. A photographer has no choice when he takes a picture, but you do not have this problem.

If your photo has a lot of detail you may choose to just use a section of the photo for the painting. You do not have to use the entire photo, just use your artistic licence and select a part of the scene to use.

Often less is more in a painting. If the foreground is complicated and detailed you might want to keep rest of the painting simple.

Simplify for Impact

Putting the majority of the detail in the foreground will help to give depth to your final piece. The further away a thing is the less detail you can see, so simplify the middle and distant areas in your painting to help give it depth.

The Composition of the Final Painting

Although you are using the photograph for your inspiration it is still necessary to consider the composition of the picture. Here are a few points to think about.

What is the focal point?Where is it placed? (It is better to avoid putting it in the centre.) You can move it to a better area if you want.

Are there objects to lead the eye into the painting? These could be paths, branches, or shapes to lead the eye in.

What about the colours? You could change a landscape to a different time of day or a different time of year? Instead of midday you could have a sunset, instead of the bare branches of winter you could have green leaves or even autumnal leaves?

Consider the contrast between the tones used in the different areas too. Again you do not need to follow those in the photo. Perhaps you want to highlight a contrast between some light and dark areas of the picture.

You can use the photo as a starting point for your painting.

However you still have the option to change things to improve the composition of the picture. For example missing out a power line in a landscape or changing the background in a portrait.

Painting the Picture for Someone Else?

If you are given a photograph and asked to paint it then be sure to check what the other person expects.

Perhaps they really want a painting of the photo just as it is, in which case you will have to try and keep the picture fairly true to the photo.

They may say that the photo is just a starting point but they want the final piece to be recognisable as the photo. In this case you have a bit more flexibility with the composition and colour of the painting.

Or they may say that they are happy for you to paint your version of the photo. This will give you the most freedom with the choices you make.

It is always best to discuss what they expect the final painting to look like. This will avoid disappointment for you both!

An Example

I painted a pet portrait from a very small photo (the dog’s head was about half an inch by half an inch in the photo) and felt that the final painting was a good likeness. Although the client was happy with the painting she said that it was her partner’s dog and she had never seen it when it was younger. The dog was going grey and this was not apparent due to the size of the photo.

For myself, I prefer to remember pets in their prime, looking healthy and alert. But I should have discussed the painting more than I had. Maybe a painting of the dog looking older would have been more appreciated by the owner.

About the Author

Catherine Calder is the author of the Acrylic Painting CourseA step-by-step painting course perfect for beginners Quick and EasyFree Report on ‘How to Paint Abstract Pictures for Pleasure and Profit’Plus a Free Preview of the course shows how to paint a sunsetVisit http://www.LearnAndDo.com/acrylic.asp

Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

Catherine Calder



RSS Feed


Report Article


Publish Article


Print Article


Add to Favorites

Article Directory
About
FAQ
Contact Us
Advanced Search
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer

GoArticles.com © 2012, All Rights Reserved.

Catherine Calder is the author of the Acrylic Painting CourseA step-by-step painting course perfect for beginners Quick and EasyFree Report on ‘How to Paint Abstract Pictures for Pleasure and Profit’Plus a Free Preview of the course shows how to paint a sunsetVisit http://www.LearnAndDo.com/acrylic.asp












Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

Find More Painting From Picture Articles

In this ArtistsNetwork.TV video workshop, Maggie shows you how to effectively use photo references to create paintings that go beyond copying to lively, lifelike art. Follow along as she completes a vibrant pastel landscape from start to finish, demonstrating how photography can help your painting, as well as how to overcome typical photographic flaws (such as issues with value, color, perspective and clutter) so that you can use your favorite photos to create beautiful paintings. In this preview, Maggie gives tips on what to do when you are stuck and unsure of where to go next as she develops foliage areas of this lovely creek scene. Visit www.ArtistsNetwork.TV in February for access to the full-length video, or visit www.NorthLightShop.com today to pre-order the DVD!
Video Rating: 4 / 5